Our Families Never Asked How We Felt but They Cared for Us

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Our Families Never Asked How We Felt but They Cared for Us

 

I just had tea with a stranger.  We swapped stories about our lives, including some oldies but goodies from our childhoods.  I was reminded that my child years were post-WWII.  Not immediate post war years but close.  The fifties were our economic comeback after war austerity.  The fifties and sixties were technological and industrial powerhouse years with lots of government involvement in people’s lives in order to assure economic good times for some.  The American middle class got a big boost from handing white male veterans extremely low cost mortgages on track housing.  They also received funds to attend college if they wanted to go.  Women who had served in the military were not as privileged.  African American veterans were also denied these advancements.  I have early memories of my veteran dad having a difficult time finding and keeping work.  My mother would like to have gone to college.  Another early memory is the television.  My parents bought us our very own television, which was still a new invention at the time.  Consumers could buy color televisions by the mid-fifties when I was born.  There wasn’t very much programming yet but there were a few puppet and storytelling shows for children so I was a happy little toddler.

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